Your Cheat Sheet for Grilling Seafood

Shop Seafood on Prime Now
Exclusively for Prime members in select ZIP codes.

What’s so great about fish on the grill? Taste, for one: There’s the smoky-sweet flavor and aroma from the grill. Then, there’s variety: From fillets to steaks to whole fish (yes, really), you’ll find a gorgeous, colorful selection at Whole Foods Market, plus all the seafood in the department is either sustainable wild caught or Responsibly Farmed.

But if seeing uncooked seafood — or, on the opposite end of the spectrum, gorgeously cooked and assembled seafood on Instagram — intimidates you, don’t let it. Once you know this routine, you’ll realize that fish on the grill is not that complicated. Promise.

5 Steps to Mastering Fish on the Grill

  1. Clean the grate. Use a brush to remove loose gunk from your grate before heating, then brush it again when it’s hot (the heat will loosen tough particles). A clean surface always reduces sticking. For added sticking protection, oil your grate as well: Hold a folded piece of paper towel with long tongs, dip the towel in a neutral oil and rub it briskly over the grates a few times before the fire is lit.

  2. Preheat the grill. Medium-high heat is ideal for most fish. This is the heat level on a charcoal grill that you can comfortably hold your hand 5 inches above the grill grate for 5 seconds before the heat becomes too intense.

  3. Season and oil the fish. An easy marinade works well (keep marinating time short, no more than 30 minutes). Or simply brush your fish with oil and sprinkle with sea salt and black pepper, or consider a tasty spice rub.

  4. Start grilling! Place fish on the grate (be careful not to use too much oil or the fire will flame) and let sit undisturbed for 3 to 5 minutes; start skin side up if you have a skin-on fillet. When fish is browned, slide a wide metal spatula under it and flip. For large fillets or whole fish, you can use two spatulas, one under each half. Lower heat or move fish to a cooler part of the grill if it chars or cooks too rapidly.

  5. Test for doneness. Fish cooks quickly, so begin testing soon after flipping. Estimate 8 to 10 minutes total time per inch of thickness. Insert a paring knife into the thickest part of the fish. When the flesh flakes, and you see just a hint of translucence at the center, it’s done. Tuna and salmon are good when slightly pink or red in the center, but cook them any way you find most appetizing.

That’s it! Transfer your fish to plates or a platter and garnish as you like, or break it into chunks for excellent tacos, dice it for serving over salads or pastas, and so much more. You can always go with a classic, like adding a simple drizzle of lemon and some fresh herbs, but grilled fish is also a perfect canvas for your favorite prepared sauce or condiment, from salsa and pesto to chutney.

Top Fish to Try

Okay, so now you know what to do, but what are you actually going to grill? Check out a few of our tried-and-true favorites.

  • Here’s your dramatic showstopper: grilling a whole fish. Whole Foods Market’s Responsibly Farmed grill-ready whole branzino (aka Mediterranean sea bass) is super convenient — already gutted, scaled and stuffed with aromatic lemon and herbs. Sprinkle one or two of them with salt and pepper, drizzle with oil and grill over medium heat about 10 minutes per inch of thickness, flipping each with two spatulas, one under the head and one under the tail end.

  • Summer is peak season for wild-caught salmon. 

Explore more